Having Room Additions is an Apt Choice for Growing Families

If you have an extended family and are looking at ways to expand your home for their convenience, then adding an extra room will be a good choice for you. Not only that, you can even increase the resale value of your home, when you plan to sell it in the near future.

Rood Additions Can Bring Home Extra Income

In today’s modern world, the standard of living is increasingly at an alarming rate. No matter how much we save, it is somehow not enough. You have to meet the needs of your families, payoff loans, utility bills and many more. Here is where room additions can help you.

You can make a room addition and have the place rented out for additional income. Secondly, if you have a hobby that you always wanted to pursue, but could not do so due to lack of space, room additions can be of great help here.

When it comes to room additions, the needs have to be planned well in advance. Look into the blueprints of your home and see where you might have extra space to build a room addition.

Room Additions as an Office

Do you have small kids or older parents at home that require regular supervising? This can be tough, especially if you are working and need to constantly juggle work and home. Having a room addition can:

  • Give you an option of working from home
  • Be close to your loved ones and tend to their needs
  • Saves on time especially if you have to commute far for work
  • You are less tensed or stress over the health and well-being of your loved ones

Looking at all the above benefits, you might finally be convinced to go in for a room addition. The next step is how you plan the whole process. If you live in and around San Diego, then you can easily contact San Diego room additions companies and enquire about reliable contractors in your area.

Choose Reputed Contractors

You need the best when it comes to redesigning your home. Ask as many questions as you can and explain what exactly you are looking at for room additions. If you have no idea about the credibility of the contractor, you can always ask for references or samples of their work.

Ensure that you call the references or visit their homes to have a look at the work done onto their rooms. If you are satisfied with their work, you can ask for an estimate and chart out a floor plan for your additional room.

When the contract is being made, ensure that it contains:

  • Timeline for completion of the project
  • Total cost for the project
  • Payment terms and conditions
  • Detailed description of the project
  • Names of the parties involved

Ensure that you keep records of all the information related to the project. Get in touch with your local building authorities to know what type of permits are required for remodeling your home.

Conclusion

Having room additions is way better than going through the hassle of finding spacious home. It also saves you from spending money on moving to a new locality or neighborhood.

 

 

 

5 Things to Keep in Mind While Choosing a Kitchen Design

Kitchens are those vital corners of a house that make it a home. You begin your day here and end it too, it is where Sunday brunches are lovingly prepared and birthday cakes are hidden. This is why, it is a good idea to invest in this space to make it an organised, easy-to-use area that scores high on storage.  While many independent homes have well-designed kitchens, getting an upgrade to a modular kitchen often makes use of space more efficiently to suit the specifications of each individual household. From the variety of modular kitchens that exist, finding one to suit your needs is easy.

image

While assessing the type of kitchen that is ideal for you, make sure to keep the following in mind.

The Cooks:  Take into account the people who are going to be using the kitchen and their needs. If you hold a lot of parties in your home, and often have more than two cooks in the kitchen, then you should consider a U-shaped kitchen design as this makes work more efficient. Whereas, for just one or two cooks, you should consider a straight kitchen design.

Space: A modular kitchen design is builtin to your existing kitchen space. Make an assessment of how long you want your countertop to be and how much room you need to be free to move around in. If you have a small space,straight kitchen designsare ideal as they take up only one wall. Theyoptimise, washing, a work-top and storage on this side and providemore room for the cook to walk around freely.

 Larger Appliances: When you plan your kitchen design, ensure that you account for your larger appliances such as your refrigerator, microwave and dishwasher.  See if you can keep them on your countertop or fit them within a closed cabinet to conceal them. Plenty of clever storage tricks are available for any space!

Think simple: It is always best to start with the basic design and build on it as you go along. Once you decide on the basic kitchen design – use it for a few days before you add embellishments or extra storage. You may come to realise that you have forgotten to account for a thing or two and can plan the extra parts to suit those needs.

Cost Factor: An investment such as this requires some thought and you need to make sure that you are clear on your financial budget for the project. Discuss your options with your service provider and choose one that you are comfortable with.

Planning a home can be expensive and the number of options available in almost every area can be mind-boggling. Remember to always keep in mind your needs while making these decisions. Choose the most efficient and durable design, you can later add to it or change its look if you want a change.

Use Shipping Pallets as Building Blocks of Rustic-Cool Style

courtesy of Shannon Acheson, AKA Design

Home improvement can be expensive—even if you want the slightly battered reclaimed-wood look, be prepared to pay through the nose. Or you could get creative with shipping pallets, the bulky wood crates companies use to move goods.

No, really. Pallets are the perfect material for just about any home project, rustic or modern, you can imagine. And you might be able to get those pallets for free. Repurpose them as smaller décor pieces, furniture, or even remodeling material for your house.

courtesy of Bobby Sue Bower, A Building We Shall Go
courtesy of Bobby Sue Bower, A Building We Shall Go

Getting creative

Bobby Sue Bower of A Building We Shall Go used pallets to create a rustic hardwood floor in her home. The idea was part inspiration, part ingenuity. After a house fire in 2012, Bower wanted to rebuild using reclaimed materials, but the cost was high.

“One contractor quoted $12,000 just for the floor,” Bower says. Instead, Bower used pallet wood—and a lot of hard work—to build the floor herself. “We just love it,” she says.

Not ready to commit to a full-room remodel? Shannon Acheson ofAKA Design used pallets to create a sliding barn door in her home.

“The inspiration was born out of both necessity and our love of all things rustic-industrial. We needed to create a bit of a barrier between our living room and the downstairs family room noise,” Acheson says.

Pallets can work outdoors, too. Funky Junk Interiors created a beach boardwalk–style walkway along a garden path by using pallet wood planks as steppingstones.

And if you’re looking for something smaller, pallets can be used to create accent furniture as well. In “Make Garbage Great,” author Albe Zakes converted a pallet into a modern-looking side table with minimal fuss.

courtesy of Funky Junk Interiors
courtesy of Funky Junk Interiors

Go get ’em

Typically, if a company—like a big-box retailer, local clothing store, or town newspaper—receives goods, it’ll have pallets. While some companies have contracts to remove and recycle these pallets, many don’t, and they’ll be happy to hand over the goods—all you need to do is ask.

If you need help finding pallets, 1001Pallets has created a Google Map of known spots.

Once you have a stack of pallets, make sure you’re taking home only the safest materials. Check for spills, stains, and discolorations, as they might be a sign of something toxic. If the pallet is clean, check for labels.

Not all pallets will have a label or stamp, but if they do, 1001Pallets says to look for the following:

  • HT: The HT label means the pallet was heat-treated. Heat-treated pallets are not harmful to your health.
  • KD: KD stands for kiln-dried lumber. Done to reduce moisture, KD isn’t harmful.
  • MB: MB pallets were fumigated with chemicals. Avoid any with this marker.
courtesy of Shannon Acheson, AKA Design
courtesy of Shannon Acheson, AKA Design

Getting down to business

To get a gorgeous end product, plan to pick up more pallets than you think you’ll actually need for your project and do a lot of inspection.

“I always tell people upfront. More than half the planks we prepared for our floor were not actually used on the floor,” says Bower. “We were very meticulous in choosing the planks we put down.”

Check each pallet for signs of warping, discoloration, or cracks. While discoloration may buff or stain out, warping and cracks could cause your project to break down quickly.

And if you find any you can’t use—don’t forget to recycle!

How to Protect Your Home From Wildfires

wildfires

As the West gets drier and hotter, the past few years have been some of the most destructive on record for wildfires. Homeowners who previously thought their property was safe from the embers might find themselves too close to the inferno’s edge—with no idea how to protect their house and belongings in the case of an emergency.

Fireproofing your home begins long before the fire spreads: Start well before the beginning of fire season and continue throughout (roughly late spring to early fall). Use a two-pronged approach: Address your home and its surrounding vegetation to create a 100-foot barrier of defensible space around your property, advises Steve Quarles, the senior scientist for fire protection at the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety. Here’s how, according to Quarles:

Prepare your noncombustible zone

Make sure there’s nothing combustible in the 5-foot zone surrounding your house. Remember, you’re trying to avoid flames as well as the windblown sparks and firebrands that a raging wildfire emits.

Swap decorative bushes and piles of firewood immediately adjoining the home with a “nonwoody kind of plant.” Think low-growing flowers, or consider swapping the plants for sidewalk or rock mulch (never a combustible mulch like bark or pine, which are “easily ignited by windblown embers,” Quarles says).

Clearing trees might keep the fire itself off your property, but the wind has other ideas. The goal of a noncombustible zone is to remove any materials that might catch fire by ember alone.

Take a walk around your house and eliminate any visible debris—but also take a good look at your siding. If it comes within 6 inches of the ground, Quarles recommends trimming it to provide separation, which is an “effective way to resist ember exposure.”

Keep your trees in check

“You cannot expect the house to survive if you don’t have a good defensible space,” Quarles says. And fire protection doesn’t stop at the end of your 5-foot noncombustible zone—for the next 25 feet, guidelines indicate tree branches should always be at least 10 feet from other trees.

Separate trees and shrubs from each other and other yard items that might catch fire (such as a play set) in order to prevent a crown fire, defined as flames erupting at or near the top of a tree. This “burns longer and hotter and causes radiant heat exposure, which can cause problems with windows and siding,” says Quarles.

Limb up your trees (translation: prune their lowest branches) in order to prevent this outcome, and ensure shrubbery is maintained and regularly watered.

Select materials with fire in mind

If your home lies in prime wildfire territory, now might be the time to remodel. And we’re not talking about putting in a new designer kitchen. “It’s really important that a house be able to resist ember exposures,” says Quarles. Before selecting any materials for renovating or adding to your home, make sure they’ll be a help—not a hindrance—if a wildfire occurs.

Replace any wood shake roofs with a Class A fire–rated roof covering, which is incredibly fire-resistant and comes in a number of styles. Quarles says that is his No. 1 priority. Surround it with a metal drip edge, which “adds an added measure of protection,” he says.

True, no material is fully fireproof, but you can decrease your risk by beginning every construction project with fire protection in mind: Choose noncombustible decking for your porch, dual-pane glass windows, and brick.

Fireproof your exterior

Reality check: Not everyone can afford to renovate their entire house, no matter how dire the wildfire risk. In that case, Quarles has a few recommendations that require only sweat equity.

Clear your gutters regularly and remove debris such as leaves and pine needles from the roof and under decks.

Speaking of those decks—don’t store anything under them, not even a broom, and especially not a gas can or firewood. “Once the deck ignites, you have a flaming exposure to many things,” says Quarles. Like your glass doors: “If the glass breaks on the door, the fire can easily enter the house.”

Check out the vents to your attic or crawl space, which should be covered by a metal screen with a mesh of an eighth of an inch or less—any larger and you risk embers slipping into your home. You’ll want this to be clean and in good condition, so examine it at least once a year to make sure it’s still free of dirt and grime.

Get This Look: Shaun White

shaunwhite-get-this-look-3-bottom-left

Extreme sports superstar Shaun White—nicknamed “The Flying Tomato”—is sellinghis remodeled Mid-Century Modern home in the Hollywood Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles. This is one of the many homes belonging to the skateboarder/ snowboarder/entrepreneur. If you’re a fan of chic Mid-Century decor in a prime location, plus a swimming pool, then read on for how to snag White’s style.

(Psst—enter our “Get This Look” sweepstakes for a chance to win a $45,000 home makeover by me!)

gtl_shaun white-01

Paneled ceiling: It’s a stylish way to add drama and warmth to a plain ceiling. The rich mahogany paneling on White’s ceiling reflects the same deep tones of his flooring, which provides a great contrast to the bright white walls. Looking for a budget-friendly alternative to real wood? Have a handyman or carpenter install Click Lock hardwood plank flooring on the ceiling. Here’s a beautiful antique birch plank, available at Home Depot for around $2 per square foot.

Cowhide rug: The cowhide rug has become a must-have for modern masculine rooms, and it’s a prominent feature in White’s living room. A good hide can cost upward of $1,000. Here’s a chic option from Overstock.com for only $230.

gtl_shaun white-02

Vintage bath: White’s home may be modern in architecture, but his master bath holds a few features that are reminiscent of the Victorian era. The antique-themed toilet and shower fixtures, claw-foot tub, and pinstripe wallpaper all create a feeling of a classic bath salon. Also, the individual sink vanities are well accented with lampshade sconces and pivot mirrors. Some of these vintage bath details are easy to re-create on a budget—here’s a great pivot mirror from Lamps Plus that’s similar to White’s mirrors, but they cost only $135.

Brass revival: Brass and gold have seen a huge resurgence in recent years, particularly in bathrooms. White’s vintage-style bathroom is punctuated by pops of bright brass on all the fixtures. This look doesn’t have to be expensive. Here’s a cool option from Kingston Brass that has the same vintage vibe, but it’s under $60 at build.com.

gtl_shaun white-03

Saloon kitchen: White’s kitchen makes quite a statement with its industrial bar stools, reclaimed wood island counter, oversize brick-toned tile, and detailed woodwork. The resulting vibe is that of an old-school saloon, reimagined as a modern kitchen. The most powerful element of this look is the deep black paint on the custom cabinetry. If custom cabinets with crown molding and carved leg detailing are out of your budget, try painting existing cabinets with a coat of rich black paint, like “Totally Black” from Behr.

Renovate Your Kitchen—Without Knocking Down a Wall

When most people think of redoing a dated ’70s- or ’80s-era kitchen, their first instinct is usually: Knock down a wall! Open up the space! Buy some gleaming, modern appliances! All fine ideas, but, sadly, not within everyone’s reach, financially oraesthetically.

Maybe you’re part of the emerging backlash against open kitchens, or maybe your checking account just can’t accommodate the open plan of your dreams. But here’s the good news: There are plenty of other approaches to maximize the space and functionality of your enclosed kitchen—and you’ll likely love the results! Check out these pointers from the experts.

Define your space

Is your kitchen primarily a workspace or more of a social hub? Because any renovation plans should take into consideration how you use it. If yours is a little bit of both, however, New York City–based architectTimo Lindman suggests creating a kitchen that flows into other areas of your home while maintaining a “defensible perimeter.”

One option: a pass-through (think of the window inside a taxi) that opens onto a living space, such as the dining room. Another way to go? Pocket doors that can be slid shut while cooking and left open at other times.

Lighten up

One key (and, weirdly, often ignored) way to make an enclosed space feel airy and contemporary is through great lighting. So if you’re renovating, expand or insert windows if possible—or consider adding a skylight. And when selecting interior light fixtures, remember that light needs to come from different directions to minimize shadows, which can render routine kitchen activities like chopping or cutting seriously dangerous. That means strategically installing overhead lights and focused pendant lamps as well as under-the-cabinet fixtures.

Skylight in kitchen
Skylight in kitchen

“If areas of counterspace or various corners of a kitchen are poorly lit, they end up as underused workspaces, which reduces the amount of overall space in a kitchen and makes it feel smaller,” explainsTyler Merson, a professional chef-turned-master carpenter who designs and installs kitchens with his New Jersey–based company,Codfish Park Design.

Choose wisely

Smaller and enclosed kitchens mean more airborne grease and steam, which can take a toll on cabinets, lighting fixtures, and wall treatments. For these spaces Merson suggests choosing painted cabinets (over varnished or stained) because they can be rejuvenated more cheaply than those requiring extensive stripping, sanding, and refinishing. Also important: Select appliances that are actually suited to your space.

Kitchen cabinets

kitchen cabinets

“As gorgeous and trendy as commercial-grade cooktops and ovens are, most domestic spaces don’t need them,” argues Merson. “In fact, their heat and output can overpower a small space, making it harder to work in and advancing the deterioration of all your finishes.”

Enclosed kitchens also require more discipline when it comes to choosing what gets to stay and what hits the recycle bin. “Over time, we all acquire kitchen paraphernalia—extra pots and pans, serving platters, random appliances that once seemed like a good idea,” says Merson. “But to maximize and enjoy a closed kitchen, you need to be ruthless and honest about what really needs to be accessible on a daily basis versus what could live in deep storage and come out only for special occasions.”

Trick your brain

In a closed kitchen, cabinet depth and placement make a world of difference. One way to fake space: Mount wall cabinets a few inches higher than the standard 18 inches above the counter. Another option is to use open shelves instead of upper cabinets (though shelves are actually best for daily-use items—like drinking glasses—that usually aren’t in place long enough to accumulate dust). Better yet, do away with the upper cabinets on one wall entirely.

“The Matrix”

Warner Bros.

"The Matrix"

“The eye needs to pause or a place of respite,” Lindman explains, “whether it’s a window or some open space where pots and pans are hung. Kitchens feel smaller when every last bit of space is maxed out for storage.”

Ultimately, just because your kitchen is separate doesn’t mean it has to be closed off or claustrophobic. “Be honest with yourself about how you use your space and what you really want from it,” counsels Merson, “and you’ll find your way to the design with the right amount of openness for you.”

You Can (and May Want to) Spend $300 on a Lightbulb

plumen3_large_large

Lighting your home seems simple enough, right? Just pick up a box of bulbs at the dollar store, screw them into the appropriate sockets, and forget about it. But if you’re after a look for your home that’s a bit warmer and more subtle than the average DMV lobby, you’re going to have to put more thought into your bulbs.

A lot has changed since the incandescent lightbulb—still the cheapest and most common type around—was invented in the late 19th century. These days you can choose from halogen bulbs, an extrastrong but dimmable type of incandescent; warm-hued, energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs; and super-energy-efficient LED (light-emitting diode) bulbs.

Exciting, right?! OK, they’re still just lightbulbs. But what if a bulb could actually help you go to sleep—or wake up? How about one that looks like a crystal goblet, or a piece of modern sculpture? If you’re willing to drop a pretty penny, they can be yours. Read on to see six fancy models that might help illuminate your path.

The bulb that demands your attention

Plumen

The bulb that demands your attention.

Original Plumen 001

The Original Plumen 001 LED lightbulb is designed to be “a centerpiece, not an afterthought,” in your home (though, hopefully, your decor is not in danger of being figuratively outshined by a lightbulb). The sculptural design is included in the permanent design collections of the Museum of Modern Art and other prominent museums.

Smoked goodness

Buster + Punch

The smoky-glass Buster Bulb.

Buster Bulb by Buster + Punch

The somewhat ominously named Buster Bulb is an amber-colored LED pipe inside an elegant smoked-glass bulb, which manufacturer Buster + Punch says creates “subtle ambient light” while also illuminating a selected spot in your home you wish to highlight.

Anybody else suddenly thirsty?

Lee Broom

Anybody else thirsty?

Crystal Bulb by Lee Broom

The Crystal Bulb is an energy-efficient LED bulb set in a delicate, hand-cut lead-crystal pattern (available in either a clear or frosted finish) that maker Lee Broom says was inspired by the patterns found on old whiskey glasses and decanters. Which is fitting, since you’ll need a stiff drink after you see how much these cost.

Looks like we need a cleanup … or do we?

Only 1

Looks like we need a cleanup...or do we?

Only 1 Biei Molten Lava Light

The Biei Molten Lava bulbs from Only 1 and designer Toshiyuki Yasuda are unique LED creations that look as though they’ve melted into a surprisingly graceful mass of glass—creating a surreal “dreamy sense of reality” as the light is gently diffused by the air bubbles and imperfections in the glass.

Nighty night…

Lighting Science

Nighty night...

Sleepy Baby Biological LED Lamp

As any parent knows, the average baby sleeps roughly 15 to 20 minutes a year—which is somewhat less than the 7.5 hours of sleep doctors say the average adult needs each night to help avoid an eventual mental and physical collapse. The Sleepy Baby Biological LED Lamp from Lighting Science is designed to help fix that by emitting just the right amount of light to fool your infant’s biological clock into thinking it’s dark and time to sleep—but still providing enough usable light that you can change diapers, fold laundry, prepare food, or just stare numbly into the middle distance, all without messing up your own internal clock.

Wake up!

GE

Wake up!

GE Align AM LED Bulb

If, on the other hand, you’re a person who has a hard time getting going in the morning, the GE Align Bulb may help. It may not look exciting, but the LED bulb is engineered to provide a bluish-white light in the morning that GE says suppresses the body’s production of melatonin, the hormone that causes drowsiness. Using this bulb (in place of other lighting) for 30 minutes each morning can help your body maintain a natural sleep-wake cycle, GE claims.

Or you could also try going to bed earlier.

Lighting your home seems simple enough, right? Just pick up a box of bulbs at the dollar store, screw them into the appropriate sockets, and forget about it. But if you’re after a look for your home that’s a bit warmer and more subtle than the average DMV lobby, you’re going to have to put more thought into your bulbs.

A lot has changed since the incandescent lightbulb—still the cheapest and most common type around—was invented in the late 19th century. These days you can choose from halogen bulbs, an extrastrong but dimmable type of incandescent; warm-hued, energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs; and super-energy-efficient LED (light-emitting diode) bulbs.

Exciting, right?! OK, they’re still just lightbulbs. But what if a bulb could actually help you go to sleep—or wake up? How about one that looks like a crystal goblet, or a piece of modern sculpture? If you’re willing to drop a pretty penny, they can be yours. Read on to see six fancy models that might help illuminate your path.

The bulb that demands your attention

Plumen

The bulb that demands your attention.

Original Plumen 001

The Original Plumen 001 LED lightbulb is designed to be “a centerpiece, not an afterthought,” in your home (though, hopefully, your decor is not in danger of being figuratively outshined by a lightbulb). The sculptural design is included in the permanent design collections of the Museum of Modern Art and other prominent museums.

Smoked goodness

Buster + Punch

The smoky-glass Buster Bulb.

Buster Bulb by Buster + Punch

The somewhat ominously named Buster Bulb is an amber-colored LED pipe inside an elegant smoked-glass bulb, which manufacturer Buster + Punch says creates “subtle ambient light” while also illuminating a selected spot in your home you wish to highlight.

Anybody else suddenly thirsty?

Lee Broom

Anybody else thirsty?

Crystal Bulb by Lee Broom

The Crystal Bulb is an energy-efficient LED bulb set in a delicate, hand-cut lead-crystal pattern (available in either a clear or frosted finish) that maker Lee Broom says was inspired by the patterns found on old whiskey glasses and decanters. Which is fitting, since you’ll need a stiff drink after you see how much these cost.

Looks like we need a cleanup … or do we?

Only 1

Looks like we need a cleanup...or do we?

Only 1 Biei Molten Lava Light

The Biei Molten Lava bulbs from Only 1 and designer Toshiyuki Yasuda are unique LED creations that look as though they’ve melted into a surprisingly graceful mass of glass—creating a surreal “dreamy sense of reality” as the light is gently diffused by the air bubbles and imperfections in the glass.

Nighty night…

Lighting Science

Nighty night...

Sleepy Baby Biological LED Lamp

As any parent knows, the average baby sleeps roughly 15 to 20 minutes a year—which is somewhat less than the 7.5 hours of sleep doctors say the average adult needs each night to help avoid an eventual mental and physical collapse. The Sleepy Baby Biological LED Lamp from Lighting Science is designed to help fix that by emitting just the right amount of light to fool your infant’s biological clock into thinking it’s dark and time to sleep—but still providing enough usable light that you can change diapers, fold laundry, prepare food, or just stare numbly into the middle distance, all without messing up your own internal clock.

Wake up!

GE

Wake up!

GE Align AM LED Bulb

If, on the other hand, you’re a person who has a hard time getting going in the morning, the GE Align Bulb may help. It may not look exciting, but the LED bulb is engineered to provide a bluish-white light in the morning that GE says suppresses the body’s production of melatonin, the hormone that causes drowsiness. Using this bulb (in place of other lighting) for 30 minutes each morning can help your body maintain a natural sleep-wake cycle, GE claims.

Or you could also try going to bed earlier.

Meryl Streep’s equal opportunities plea virtually ignored by Congress

Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep has revealed she received only five responses after writing personally to all 535 members of the US congress calling for the introduction of new equality laws.

The three-time Oscar winning actor told an audience at the Telluride film festival, where her film Suffragette screened this weekend, that she was virtually ignored by the 435 representatives and 100 senators who make up the bicameral legislature.

“I sent them each a book called Equal Means Equal by Jessica Neuwirth,” said Streep, who cameos as women’s rights campaigner Emmeline Pankhurst in Sarah Gavron’s forthcoming feminist historical drama. “It’s about the revival of the attempt to get an ERA [Equal Rights Amendment], that would codify in law that you can’t discriminate against women. I got five answers.”

Hollywood’s own struggles with equality have been in the headlines over the past year and Streep noted that just 1% of movies were currently directed by women. “It has to do with our discomfort with women in leadership,” she said. At an earlier Telluride panel, the star of The Iron Lady and Kramer vs Kramer said young female film-makers “do exist, they graduate, they’re good – and then they don’t get hired. Why?” She added: “Maureen Dowd is writing a great big exposé about this question in the New York Times Magazine, coming up soon.”

The actor, who is remembered for pointing and shouting “yes!” at February’s Oscars when Patricia Arquette used her best supporting actress acceptance speech to call for equal pay and rights for women, said her own feminist instincts had been inspired by hearing her mother being forced to ask her father for money as a child, even though the former had her own job as a commercial artist. “I remember those conversations, hearing them upstairs, the back and forth,” said Streep. “I remember thinking, ‘I will never have to ask anybody for money. I will have my own money.’”

Suffragette, which stars Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter, Romola Garai, Anne-Marie Duff, Natalie Press, Ben Whishaw and Brendan Gleeson, is based on a screenplay by the British writer of Shame and The Iron Lady, Abi Morgan. Streep appears in just a single scene as Pankhurst, but has handled many of the press duties at Telluride with Mulligan absent due to pregnancy.

The film has been hailed with largely positive reviews at the festival, with Mulligan in particular beginning to attract Oscar buzz. However, the Guardian’s Catherine Shoard offered only guarded praise. “Suffragette doesn’t just exist on its own terms, but in its own time, too,” she writes. “It’s a peculiarly hermetic watch – the first world war, for instance, goes unmentioned. Gavron has made a decent film with near horizons, a civil disobedience picture that’s not as politely produced as you’d think. But a classic? I abstain.”